Academy of Nursing and Health Sciences Program of Study

The Academy of Nursing and Health Sciences promotes lifelong learning and healthy lifestyles in a safe and supportive environment. The Academy engages highly qualified teachers to prepare young men and women to pursue a post secondary college and career program by offering a diverse course of study.

English Course Descriptions

English I

Freshman students at the Nursing Academy will learn skills and strategies to improve background knowledge, comprehension, and critical thinking. Students will study different non-fiction texts and learn how to make connections, generate questions, and write initial reactions.

Public Speaking:

College and Career Pathways students will develop the ability to speak confidently and effectively in a healthcare related situation. Students will prepare and present several different types of speeches that healthcare professionals are often required to make. Particular attention is paid to style, persuasion, credibility of information and character, and use of technology as an aide in public speech. Students will research and properly cite from a variety of sources.
 
College Career Pathways/CCP
CCP is a collaborative program between Capital Community College and area high schools. Students receive dual credit upon successful completion of these courses. 
 
Creative Writing

This introductory course explores creativity through writing in the forms of short stories, essays, poetry, and more. Students read various types of literature, fiction and non-fiction, and identify features of successful pieces. Through this process, students learn about writing conventions and literary traits while keeping in mind how they want to shape their own writing. Students create several longer creative portfolios following the complete writing process, utilizing the various techniques they have been exposed to.

(Back to Top)

English II :
This course is also offered at Honors level.

Sophomore students at the Nursing Academy will learn skills and strategies to improve reading comprehension, reading speed, fluency, appreciation and articulation in reading.  Through a variety of mediums, including non-linguistic representations, essays, presentations and multimedia, students are encouraged to read critically and evaluate genres including short stories, non-fiction, drama, and journalism.    Students will respond to literature in accordance with CAPT protocol and expectations in order to explore, connect, make inferences, draw conclusions and appraise literary qualities and characteristics. (English lab paired with course.)

American Literature

This course is also offered at Honors level.

This skill-based curriculum of American literature focuses on students actively using reading skills that generate both inferential and original thought questions. Before reading, students will activate prior knowledge and ask questions they want to know about the text. During reading, students will ask factual and interpretive questions about the text and choose key lines from text that support detail exploration where these thought-provoking questions lead students into writing extended responses.  Genres include short stories, poetry, novels, and a drama.

Read 180 Program / Reading Lit 1

Small group instruction, modeled and independent reading as well as the use of instructional software to teach main idea, cause and effect, sequencing, inferences, new vocabulary and comprehension skills.  This course is for students who need practice in basic functional reading skills. Students will practice word attack skills: phonemic awareness, sound-symbols identification, sounding out regular and irregular and irregular words.
Imbedded in the Read 180 program are lessons on developing expository, narrative and persuasive writing.   Over 60% of the Read 180 program is non-fiction based in preparation for the RFI part of the CAPT.  Students are required to read novels and respond to the literature with short essays in preparation for the RTL part of the CAPT. (Reading lab paired with course)

System 44

This course is a prerequisite for Read 180.  This program is a teacher directed computerized decoding program.  SEE Read 180.

Literature and Composition

This course is also offered at Honors and AP level.
 
This skill-based curriculum of world literature focuses on students actively using reading skills that generate both inferential and original thought questions. Before reading, students will activate prior knowledge and ask questions they want to know about the text. During reading, students will ask factual and interpretive questions about the text and choose key lines from text that support detail exploration where these thought-provoking questions lead students into writing extended responses.  Genres include short stories, poetry, novels, and the Shakespearian drama, Macbeth. Genres include short stories, poetry, novels, plays, philosophy, and essays.

AP Literature and Composition

This course will provide students with the intellectual challenges and workload of a college level course.  Students who earn a grade of 3 or above on the exam will be granted college credit at most colleges.

Through the literature in the course students will study universal themes, and explore historical connections and gain an understanding of how literature reflects and serves as the basis for many of our western cultural values.  More specifically students will explore how the cultural roles for men and women differ, and what happens when those roles are not adhered to.  How our western society treats those who break its rules. (See AP guidelines.)

Capstone

Capstone Project Requirement for Graduating Seniors
The Capstone Project, an intensive, active learning project, is a requirement for all seniors as a culminating educational experience. During sophomore and junior year, students will reflect on research interests and possible focus topics in health care, health sciences, psychology, developmental psychology, sociology, public health or global health. The Capstone Project will be identified within the first few weeks of their senior capstone course and the teacher will guide students through the process of research, presentation development, and alignment with shadow or internship experiences as applicable. Students will present their topic to peers, faculty, health care professionals on the academy advisory board or a combination of all.

ESOL I (Level 1)

This course is a beginning course in English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) who have little or no English proficiency. Students learn the basic elements of grammar, conversational English, rudiments of writing, and reading comprehension. Instruction involves interactive, hands-on learning activities. Students are given individual support to develop their basic English skills.

ESOL II (Level 2)

This course is a low-intermediate level course in English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) who have successfully completed ESOL I. Students continue to develop their oral, writing, and reading skills. Content-rich materials are used to enhance students’ English proficiency.

ESOL III (Level 3)

This course is an intermediate level course in English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) who have successfully completed ESOL II. This class is designed to prepare students to enter and succeed in mainstream English classes. Students focus on learning strategies and techniques to master both language and academic content simultaneously. A more intensive study of genres is presented.  

(Back to Top)

 

Social Studies Course Descriptions

Civics

Civics provides the foundation for students’ active and informed participation in our society and for an understanding of the interaction between ideals, principles and practices of citizenship. This course examines the Constitutional Foundation of American government and society, the role and structure of government, types of political systems, the political process, civic rights and responsibilities, and American foreign policy.

Geography

United States History

This course is also offered at Honors and AP levels.  

This course investigates the forces that shape the political, social and economic institutions of modern America. An in-depth exploration of the United States in the 20th century and today, including contemporary issues and the place of the United States in the global world, will provide the framework for the study.  The continued development of the historical themes, including the meaning of freedom, and of historical thinking skills will be a focus of this course.

AP United States History

This course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to work critically with an in-depth study of United States History.  The challenges of this program prepare students for intermediate and advanced college courses.  Emphasis will be placed on in-depth study of American history as students learn higher-level historical thinking and research skills.  These will include the ability to assess historical materials and to weigh evidence and interpretations in historical scholarship.  Students will learn to arrive at educated conclusions on the basis of informed judgments and to present reasons and evidence to support this reasoning clearly and persuasively.  Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.  (See AP guidelines.)

Sociology

This course studies social life, social causes, and the consequences of human behavior. It provides students with the opportunity to develop and apply sociological concepts and perspectives concerning human groups focusing on life experiences, attitudes, and values in the context of social categories such as social class, race/ethnicity, sex, sexuality, and nationality. T hey will begin to develop fundamental concepts of socialization, culture, organization, ethics, stratification and societies, as well as research methodology.

Global Health (National Academy Foundation course)

Global Health introduces students to public health on a global scale. Students learn what disease is and investigate how it impacts world populations. By studying different societies, they learn about the relationship between health and socioeconomic development. Students learn how environmental, nutritional, and behavioral risk factors jeopardize health. And then they learn how communities, the government, and cooperative global efforts can intervene to improve health. Wherever possible, students first study each concept as it applies to their own community, and then look at it in a more global context. In many lessons students practice deciphering and interpreting the data they find in tables, charts, graphs, and maps. Students are exposed to working with information compiled by the foremost global health agencies, such as the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Bank, and UNICEF. At the conclusion of the course, students have a chance to explore what it would be like to have a career in global health.

Psychology

This introductory course in Psychology introduces students to the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings.  Students study the knowledge and the theory associated with the study of the human behavior, learning, and the human mind, as well as the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Developmental Psychology

(This course is also offered as College and Career Pathways course.)

This course will provide an overview and introduction to the study of development through the lifespan.  Students will gain an understanding and appreciation for the development of humans by investigating prominent theories, research, and issues of diversity.  Most importantly students will be able to better understand the complexities of each stage of the lifespan to help prepare them for a future in the nursing/medical field.

College Career Pathways/CCP

CCP is a collaborative program between Capital Community College and area high schools. Students receive dual credit upon successful completion of this course.   

Current Issues/Current Issues in Health Care

This course is an issues-based exploration of today’s interdependent world.  Students will study current history-making events and issues throughout the world and the impact of these events upon our world, nation, community and our own lives.  Current periodicals, medical journals, and internet sites are the major learning resource for this course.

(Back to Top)

Mathematics Course Descriptions

Algebra 1

This mathematics course focuses on the essential ideas and processes of mathematics with an emphasis on the development of understanding and application of important concepts to real life and interdisciplinary contexts.  This course includes exploration mathematical ideas so that students see how the concepts, skills and logical thinking build on and connect to other mathematical ideas.  Students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and principles through problem solving.  Topics included in course are patterns, linear equations and inequalities, functions, linear functions, scatter plots and trend lines, systems of linear equations, an introduction to exponential functions, and quadratic functions.  This course is aligned to the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics.

Geometry

In this course students study points, lines, and angles in a plane; parallel lines and transversals; polynomials; area, perimeter/circumference, and volume of geometric shapes; geometric transformations on the coordinate plan; the Pythagorean Theorem and other geometry topics.  This course is aligned with the Geometry and Measurement strand in the Connecticut Framework, with review of the other strands.
(Geometry lab paired with course.)

Geometry Honors

This course, designed for students who have completed a rigorous course in first year algebra prior to grade 10, includes all the topics in Geometry. Greater emphasis is placed on three-dimensional, coordinate and transformational geometry, the structure of a mathematical system, abstract reasoning and proof.  This course is aligned with the Geometry and Measurement strand in the Connecticut Framework, with review of the other three strands.

Algebra II

(This course is also offered as College and Career Pathways course.)

Students will build on the sequential and spiraling approaches to content and skills from their preceding courses.  Topics addressed include modeling and predicting, polynomials, functions, systems of equations, quadratic functions, analytic geometry and trigonometric equations.  The use of graphing calculators continues to be integral part of the curriculum. The course focuses on the mathematics placement criteria used at local universities and on the mathematics section of the SAT.

CCP Algebra II

This course, designed for students who have completed a rigorous course in first year algebra and geometry, includes all the topics in Algebra 2.  This course helps students gain an appreciation for the role variables play in constructing mathematical models; use tables, graphs, and equations to model mathematical situations; gain facility in using the symbolism of algebra to solve equations and find equivalent expressions; gain facility in solving word problems; and gain an appreciation for the applications of algebra to a wide variety of “real world” situations, specifically in the field of nursing.  This course, aligned with the Connecticut Framework and Capital College Math 137 Intermediate Algebra Course, prepares students for further courses in higher mathematics and the mathematics portion of the SAT. Successful completion of the course can earn the student 3 college-level semester credits from Capital College.

Statistics

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  It explores the role of probability in making statistical inferences and provides experiences with problems from a variety of areas in the medical field.  This course is aligned with the Working with Data strand of the Connecticut Framework.

Pre-calculus

Pre-calculus topics include functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational functions, analytic geometry, trigonometry and probability.  The use of graphing calculators is incorporated throughout the course to prepare students for calculus and other advanced mathematics.  A balance of algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal methods is used to reinforce comprehension, problem solving and critical thinking skills.  The course focuses on the mathematics placement criteria used at local universities and on the mathematics section of the SAT.

College Math

This course is designed in alignment with the CCSS. It is designed to build student's math skills based upon the results of the Accuplacer exam (college entrance exam), preparing them to take credit level math upon entrance to college. The course utilizes a self paced, teacher facilitated computer program, ALEKS. 

Work Readiness Math

This course is for students who need practice basic math skills.  The course focuses on functional skills, basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, fractions, counting and making change.  Instruction is based on the student’s IEP.

(Back to Top)

 

World Language Course Descriptions

Spanish I

This course provides an introduction to the language, geography, world contributions and cultures (Products, Practices & Perspectives) of the Spanish-speaking world, including Spain, North, Central and South America, the Caribbean and Africa, through which students learn to understand, produce and manipulate language, in order to communicate about self, others, needs, wants, activities of daily life, in both the present and the past. The course stresses vocabulary acquisition and usage, sentence structure, and basic grammatical principles. Themes of nursing/healthcare are woven throughout the course.

Spanish II

Pre-requisite: successful completion of Spanish I, with a C or better, or placement via the National Spanish STAMP or CAP test. 

This course builds upon the language knowledge & skills attained in Spanish-I, or attained by alternative/real-world language exposure and/or experience. Students continue to develop their knowledge about the Spanish-speaking world, its language and its cultures, through which they learn to understand and produce language that will enable them to communicate about daily routines, abstract concepts such as feelings and emotions, and describing present, past and future actions/events. They will utilize nursing themes and understand the impact of culture and language on an individual’s perception of health care, the way they view their health, and their ability to access health care.

Spanish III

Pre-requisite: successful completion of Spanish II, with a C or better, or placement via the National Spanish STAMP or CAP test.

This course builds upon the language knowledge & skills attained in Spanish II, or attained by alternative/real-world language exposure and/or experience. At this level, students will focus on Spanish language comprehension and production specific to the nursing and healthcare professions, while also strengthening their overall understanding of health issues, terminology & concepts related to nursing and healthcare. Attention will be paid to Hispanic cultural beliefs & practices as they relate to health issues that are prevalent in the Hispanic communities.  The class is conducted almost entirely in the Spanish language, with students working on acquisition and use of vocabulary, challenging students through oral discussions, readings, and writing exercises.

Spanish IV

Pre-requisite: successful completion of Spanish III, with a C or better, or placement via the National Spanish STAMP or CAP test.

Taught exclusively in Spanish, this course focuses on professional language use. It requires students to already understand authentic oral & written language, and speak Spanish clearly. Through authentic texts, literature, films, and current events about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries, students learn advanced grammar, spelling, and punctuation rules, providing them with a strong grammatical basis to express ideas in speaking and writing, using complete sentences & paragraphs, while refining proficiency in the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading & writing).

French I

This course provides an introduction to the language, geography, world contributions, cultures (Products, Practices & Perspectives) of the Francophone world, including North & South America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Pacific region, through which students learn to understand, produce and manipulate language, in order to communicate about self, others, needs, wants, activities of daily life, in both the present and the past. The course stresses vocabulary acquisition and usage, sentence structure, and basic grammatical principles. Themes of nursing/healthcare are woven throughout the course.

French II

Pre-requisite: successful completion of French I, with a C or better, or placement via the National French STAMP or CAP test. 

This course builds upon the language knowledge & skills attained in French-I, or attained by alternative/real-world language exposure and/or experience. Students continue to develop their knowledge about the Francophone world, its language and its cultures, through which they learn to understand and produce language that will enable them to communicate about daily routines, abstract concepts such as feelings and emotions, and describing present, past and future actions/events. They will utilize nursing themes and understand the impact of culture and language on an individual’s perception of health care, the way they view their health, and their ability to access health care.

(Back to Top)

 

Science Course Descriptions

Health and Wellness

The Health and Wellness Curriculum Framework provides a blueprint for how students can live an active and healthy life.  While strong linkages are made between Comprehensive School Health Education and Comprehensive Physical Education, each remains a defined curricular content area taught by appropriately certified teachers.  The curriculum focuses on eight content standards:  Core Concepts, Accessing Health Information, Analyzing Internal & External Influences, Interpersonal Skills, Communication Skills, Decision Making Skills, Goal Setting Skills, and Self Advocacy Skills.  The Curriculum includes Human Sexuality.

Physical Science

The study of non-living matter. Physical science includes physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geology. Students will explore matter, energy, and their interactions. 

Biology

This course is also offered at Honors and AP level.

This introductory Biology course is designed to present the biological principles that govern living things in order to become better equipped to make logical decisions when presented with the biological problems of everyday life. This course expects students to use the language of math and science to demonstrate the comprehension of concepts through the use of oral, written, lab and computer skills. An in-depth and rigorous treatment of the following topics is presented: The Scientific Method and Use of Technology, The Chemical Basis of Life, the Organization of Living Things, the Diversity of Life, Genetics, Body Systems, Ecology and Evolution. Students will also complete two of the CAPT Curriculum Embedded Performance Tasks during this course.

AP Biology

Prerequisite: One year of biology with a “B” or better and one year of Chemistry with a “B” or better or permission of the instructor

Advanced Placement Biology is a college level introductory course biology course.  Students taking this course are expected to take the AP Biology exam in May.  The objectives of AP Biology are to enable the student to understand and appreciate 1) The characteristics of living things, including the kingdoms of bacteria, protists, plants, fungi, and animals,  2) the general features of cells, cell theory, metabolism, structure and function, 3) reproduction, including asexual and sexual reproduction, mitosis and meiosis and life cycles in plants and animals, 4) heredity and genetics, including Mendelian genetics, mutations and human genetics, 5) The general principles of evolution, and 6) ecology, the interrelationship among organisms and their environment, ecosystems, and environmental problems. The human physiology component includes the development, histology, organization, neural control and integration of body systems.
Primary emphasis is placed on personal experience in scientific inquiry and recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics in biology and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.
A student considering taking AP/UCONN Biology should be prepared for a rigorous curriculum with an emphasis placed on depth of knowledge and understanding. (See AP Guidelines)

Environmental science

Environmental science involves the study of organisms and the basic structure of the ecosystem.  The focus of the course explores the relationship between environment, community, and nutrition and wellness.  The course requires students conduct laboratory experiments, participate in field studies, and conduct scientific research.

Chemistry

This course is also offered at Honors level.

This introductory chemistry course integrates experimentation with extensive class discussion.  The language of mathematics is employed often when investigating the concepts presented in this course.  An in depth treatment of the following topics is presented:  Periodicity, Shapes & Formulas, Bonding, Organic Chemistry, Rates of Chemical Reactions, The Mole & Stoichiometry, and Gases & Solutions.  Successful completion of Algebra 1 is strongly advised prior to taking the course.

Physics

Physics is a study of the laws of the natural world.  In this class, we will be studying these laws that govern the world around you.  Just as one can appreciate a baseball or basketball game to its fullest only after learning all of the rules of the sport, by learning the laws of physics one can hope to gain a full appreciation of the world in which we live.  Topics covered in this class include motion, forces, momentum, energy, sound, electricity and magnetism, and light. 

Allied Health/ FHST

The Foundations of Health Science and Technology (FHST) course is an overview of healthcare occupations and the skills required for success in the health service industry. The course includes academics in healthcare, ethics, teamwork, employability skills, health maintenance and safety practices, and information technology and its impact on the quality of healthcare services. The course examines the medical needs of a culturally diverse society and the legal responsibilities of healthcare providers. A basic study of human anatomy and physiology is included.

Intro to Health Care Careers (National Academy Foundation course)

Health Careers Exploration is a survey course designed to introduce students to a broad spectrum of health careers. The course covers careers from the five pathways: diagnostic services, therapeutic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development. For each career they study, students examine the main tasks and challenges of professionals in that career, the treatments they administer, and the interaction those professionals have with other professionals. Students learn about the educational requirements and the employment and salary outlook for each career, and they evaluate how their own skills, abilities, and interests align with different careers. Where possible, students do authentic hands-on work that a professional would do, such as reviewing scans and MRIs, taking vital signs, treating a wound, and completing dental charts.

Anatomy and Physiology

(This course is also offered as College and Career Pathways course and a National Academy Foundation course)

This is an introductory course in human biology stressing chemical and physical principles governing body structure and function.  Part One. Study includes biochemistry, organization and function of the cell, development, histology, support and movement, neural control and integration.  Part Two. Study includes endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, immune, digestive, urinary, reproduction, heredity and genetics.

College Career Pathways/CCP

CCP is a collaborative program between Capital Community College and area high schools. Students receive dual credit upon successful completion of this course.  

Public Health

Topics in Public health introduces students to the breadth and depth of public health and its significance in their lives. The course demonstrates to students how early public health achievements, control of epidemics and access to clean water, have led the way to the health and economic development of communities and nations. The course increases the health literacy of students and helps them recognize how their own health behaviors influence the health of the greater community. Each unit offers exposure to a broad range of public health careers and demonstrates both differences and interrelatedness between public health and health care disciplines. The course develops 21st century skills and meets established standards for public health-related topics covered in math, science, civics, environmental health, family and consumer science, health education, and medical careers.     

Life Skills

This course is for students who need independent living skills.  Instruction includes identifying you strengths and weaknesses.  Students learn to set appropriate goals needed to obtain employment.
The course focuses on health, specific job skills, banking skills, using a checking account, planning a budget, locating an apartment, and being a wise consumer.

(Back to Top)

 

The Arts

By the end of Grade 12, students will create, perform and respond with understanding to all of the arts, including dance, music, theatre and the visual arts; develop in-depth skills in at least one art form; appreciate the importance of the arts in expressing human experience; and be prepared to apply their arts skills and understandings throughout their lifetime.

Art Course Description

By the end of Grade 12, students will create, perform and respond with understanding to all of the arts, including dance, music, theatre and the visual arts; develop in-depth skills in at least one art form; appreciate the importance of the arts in expressing human experience; and be prepared to apply their arts skills and understandings throughout their lifetime.

Students are able to experience both 2-D and 3-D art using various media.  Art classes include:  drawing, painting, sewing, foil relief, art history, cultural connections through various art works, and different crafts that are useful outside of the school environment.

Music

This course will provide students with the opportunity to study the musical concepts of melody, rhythm, harmony, and form. Students will learn the elements of basic music notation (reading music),  singing (technique and repertoire), instruments of the orchestra (piano), composers of note, historic music periods (Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modern). They will utilize computer based programs to enrich their in class experiences.

(Back to Top)

 

Physical Education Course Description

The students will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and nutritional behavior which contributes to optimal personal fitness and progress in areas of muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and aerobic endurance.  Students will be exposed to a variety of activities which will help to increase their level of fitness.
Connecticut Physical Fitness Assessment – Students will take a pre and post test in the following: Curl-up, Push-up, 20 Meter PACER, and Sit and Reach.
Weight Training – Students will chart their own progress while using the nautilus equipment as well as the free weight room.
American Red Cross Learn to Swim Program - After an initial swimming test, students will be placed in the appropriate level according to their ability as defined by the American Red Cross learn to swim program.   Students are issued cards for each level they have passed.
Aquatics – Students will be participating in water polo, lap swim, and water aerobics.
Activities: Volleyball, badminton, cardio kickboxing, tennis, basketball, and swimming. 

Advanced Placement Guidelines

Only top ranking students who are willing and able to engage in intensive study should request AP courses. Student selection will be determined by teacher recommendation, class grades, and standardized test scores. All students enrolled in AP courses are expected to take the AP exam in the spring.

Service-Learning

A teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. Students learn and develop through active participation in organized experiences that actually meet community needs. Students must serve 60 hours over the course of their high school career, to fulfill graduation requirements.

(Back to Top)

Contact us

Academy of Nursing and Health Sciences
55 Forest Street, Hartford, CT 06105
(860) 695-1325
(860) 695-1305